Venice Real Osterie

A selection of Venice Osterie where you can get wonderful food for 30Euro or less!

La Frasca

This is a small restaurant with just the owner and his chef. Pleasant, no-frills trattoria on a quiet residential square. For a taste of tagliata di calimaro (sliced grilled squid) with arugula or pomodorini tomatoes with strawberries and violet artichokes, wend your way up quintessential calli to La Frasca. Far from the maddening San Marco crowds, this tiny eatery nestled on a remote campiello charms before you even taste the seafood sampler of grilled seppie cuttlefish, canoce mantis shrimp, excellent baccalà mantecato, or sarde in saor. Wines are an important part of the meal here; ask for a recommendation from the ample list of predominantly regional selections. With limited indoor seating, La Frasca encloses and heats their outdoor terrace to accommodate winter diners.

Address: Corte de la Carità, Cannaregio 5176, Venice, 30121 Phone: 041/2412585 Vaporetto: Fondamente Nove No lunch Mon. and Wed.

Dalla Marisa

Signora Marisa is a culinary legend in Venice, with locals calling up days in advance to ask her to prepare ancient recipes such as risotto con le secoe (risotto made with a cut of beef from around the spine). Pasta dishes include the excellent tagliatelle con sugo di masaro (in duck sauce), while secondi range from tripe to roast stuffed pheasant. In summer, tables spill out from the tiny interior on to the fondamenta. Book well ahead - and remember, serving times are rigid: turn up late and you'll go hungry. There's a €15 lunch menu..

Cannaregio 652B, fondamenta San Giobbe Vaporetto Crea or Tre Archi Telephone 041 720 211 Meals served noon-2.30pm Mon, Wed, Sun; noon-2.30pm, 8-9.15pm Tue, Thur-Sat. Closed Aug

Trattoria Ca’ D’Oro

“This picturesque osteria [informal restaurant or tavern] has a well-stocked cicchetti [small plate] counter plus small tables in the back if you order from the menu.”—Michela Scibilia, author, Venice Osterie. One of the oldest wine bars in the city and also known as Alla Vedova; popular with locals and travelers barhopping along Strada Nova; serves Venetian classics and is famous for its polpette (meatballs).

Cannaregio 3912; tel. 39 041 528 5324.

Osteria al Garanghelo

“One of the ever decreasing number of old-time Venetian osterie.”—Ruth Edenbaum, author, Chow Venice: Savoring the Food and Wine of La Serenissima. This simple, casual restaurant is low-key and local; cicchetti (small plates) up front and tables in back; wines by the glass; menu includes a vegetable antipasta platter, seafood starters like sarde in saor (Venetian-style marinated sardines), and pastas.

Close to Rialto market. San Polo 1570; tel. 39 041 721 721.

Dai Tosi (37)

If you're stuck for somewhere to eat after a visit to the Art or Architecture Biennale and are in the mood for cheap and cheerful refuelling, this neighbourhood trattoria-pizzeria, in a residential street that always seems to be festooned with laundry, should fit the bill perfectly. In summer, when they put tables outside in the street, there are few more picturesque dining backdrops in Venice. The pizzas are fine and filling (try the gorgonzola, radicchio and walnut topping), and they also do a good range of Venetian and pan-Italian pasta dishes. This is a good place to come with kids, who can work up an appetite in the play area near the Giardini vaporetto stop. Beware of mixing this up with another nearby namesake restaurant; if you're in any doubt, ask for 'Dai Tosi Piccoli' (Little Dai Tosi).

In summer, when they put tables outside in the street, there are few more picturesque dining backdrops in Venice.
In summer, when they put tables outside in the street, there are few more picturesque dining backdrops in Venice.

In summer, when they put tables outside in the street, there are few more picturesque dining backdrops in Venice.

Address: Castello 738, Secco Marina, 30122 Getting there: Vaporetto stop Giardini Contact: 00 39 041 523 7102; trattoriadaitosi.comOpening times: Mon, Tue, Thu, midday-2pm; Fri-Sun, midday-2pm, 7pm-9.30pm Prices: pizzas from €5, pasta dishes around €12 Payment type: credit cards accepted Cuisine: Italian, pizza Reservations: not necessary

 

20 Things to do in Venice – 15/20 Acqua Alta Bookshop

As you walk in the Acqua Alta bookshop you will be greeted by Luigi and one of his cats Luigi and one of his Cats at Libreria Acqua Alta in Venice (Marco Secchi)

Walk in the labyrinth of interconnected rooms, and you will see the full-sized gondola in the middle of the shop, overflowing with books then along to bathtubs filled with books and sleeping cats you will find a doorway leading straight out onto a canal where the water level seems a precarious few centimeters away from spilling into the room. It happened to us to get there in a rainy day and the owner was moving all the books from the floor to bathtubs and shelves because of the danger of high water level!

Keep searching (for books and memorable shots) and you’ll find yourself in a tiny quiet courtyard which hosts a staircase made entirely from books. Climb up to the top for a lovely view onto the Venice canals.

You may feel literally overwhelmed by books. New and old, romance and science fiction, best sellers and b-series novels, you can find anything here if you are patient enough to search. It’s possible that you won’t be able to find any specific books given the bizarre nature of the piles, or you may don’t like the smell of humidity or second hand books, but you should include a visit to Acqua Alta into your Venice tour anyway.

Libreria Acqua Alta Calle Longa Santa Maria Formosa (Campiello Del Tintor) | 5176 - Castello, 30122 Venice, Italy

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If you are looking for unusual, rare, incredibly interesting books about Venice a REAL must is 
Libreria Editrice Franco Filippi Castello, Casselleria 5284 Venezia 30122
FRANCO IS A WONDERFUL GUY AND AN AMAZING LIBRARIAN AND EDITOR!

FAQ Portraits during a Venice Photo Walk

Behind a nearly negative feedback on Tripadvisor …I got close to get my very first negative feedback after 2 years…and 138 excellent comments!

Dmitriy and his wife, a lovely couple from Russia, took a photo walk, before the meeting we agreed about a Gondola Portrait Photo Walk then due to being a bit late in the day I told them would have been a  Normal Photo Walk and I would have taken few photos….and charged them accordingly. Final results…and rightly so… he was not too happy with the pictures on the other side I knew I had just “taken” some informal pics so was happy with my work.

In some way apart the stress for me and Dmitriy, it was good for me because it teach  me a few more things about this kind of  portraits during a photo walk or a gondola ride

So let’s try to wrap up  some ideas for me and my future guest…

- I have removed the Portrait add on from the Photo Walks. Was far too risky and iffy. I will be more than happy to take for free a few snaps with your camera during a Photo walk. Just ask

Then….few words of advice if you are planning to have your photo taken ….

  • This is not the right service if you want the pictures to be a memorable lifetime event. Does not sobstitute  a wedding or engagement photography session either!
  • Try to listen to the photographer if he tells you that light is not particularly nice at that time of the day
  • Properly groomed and nice hair go a long way
  • Wear  smart clothes and nice shoes…do not wear shorts or tennis shoes
  • Smile and look at the camera ….at least few times
  • A photographer is not  a magician…..if  I look like Danny DeVito…. in pictures I will not be George Clooney …no matter the photographer I used
  • Please remember that a mini portrait session during a Gondola or a Photo Walk will never be like a full portrait session in terms of equipment, lights, time …but also price!!  Check here  for my Portraits Sessions
  • Check and then check again my portfolio and my style. If you do not like 100% my style it is very unlikely you will like your pictures….there is no if or but… Ask me for details of other colleagues.
  • If you are unhappy talk with the photographer, explain the problem.
  • During a session I will take may be 150-250 frames but you will ONLY get an edited version with between 15 to 25 images depends on the package you have chosen . You will never get ALL the shots or the RAW (Negative files)

Keeping it Fun! 

A good expression on every face is the very heart of the family portrait. Organize everything before your session so that you do not feel hurried and hassled. This will ensure good expressions!

Clothing

I like to design family or couple portraits with a coordinated color scheme. Keep this in mind when you choose your wardrobe. You do not have to be matchy-matchy, but colors should compliment each other. Usually, I recommend warm-toned clothing for your family portrait. We suggest Black (always flattering ), ‘ Navy Blue, Forest Green, and Burgundy Red, our favorite color. Solid white shirts or pants will emphasize the clothing and not the person. In harsh light white clothing can create a long list of avoidable issues. So, our recommendation is to limit solid white clothing if you can. Yes, Levi’s are fine.

Look for Pose Inspiration

I often try to find poses in magazines or online but send me ideas of images you have seen before abd that you like.

Think Action

A picture of a couple with  faces side-by-side can be nice, but even a beautiful image can be a bit boring if it is static. I will try to incorporate action into your portrait. Please remeber to try to engage in some action

Tell a Story

Powerful images tell stories. Help me in telling how you as a couple normally interact with one another!  Are you serious and very deep/romantic? Or  constantly giggling and playful?

 Get intimate

A quiet moment in a hug, or a soft kiss can be the perfect image to capture a relationship.

Photo By: Marco Secchi
Photo By: Marco Secchi
Photo By: Marco Secchi 2012
Photo By: Marco Secchi 2012
Photo By: Marco Secchi 2012
Photo By: Marco Secchi 2012

Venice Redentore 2013

Redentore means “Redeemer” in Italian, and the Festa del Redentore Venice is in celebration of the city’s deliverance from the ravages of the plague in 1577. The Venice Redentore Festival is held on the third Saturday and Sunday of July. A grand secular celebration with festive dinners and fireworks occurs on Saturday evening. Sunday is reserved for religious observances, including High Mass at the Redentore Church and in afternoon regattas in the lagoon. VENICE, ITALY - JULY 20:  Childrens wearing gondoliers shirts listen to the speaches of the Major of Venice and the Patriarch of Venice during the opening of the Redentore Celebrations on July 20, 2013 in Venice, Italy. Redentore is one of the most loved celebrations by Venetians which is in remembrance for the end of the 1577 plague. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and a spectacular fireworks display.  (Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images) (Marco Secchi/Getty Images)

 

VENICE, ITALY - JULY 20:  People gather on boats of all sizes at Punta della Dogana  in St Mark's basin for the Redentore Celebrations on July 20, 2013 in Venice, Italy. Redentore is one of the most loved celebrations by Venetians which is in remembrance for the end of the 1577 plague. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and a spectacular fireworks display. (Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images) (Marco Secchi/Getty Images)

 

VENICE, ITALY - JULY 20:  Fireworks explode over the St. Mark's Basin for the Redentore Celebrations on July 20, 2013 in Venice, Italy. Redentore, which is in remembrance of the end of the 1577 plague, is one of Venice's most loved celebrations. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St. Mark's Basin and a spectacular fireworks display.  (Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images) (Marco Secchi/Getty Images)

Photo Gallery is here

My Fav Hotels in Venice

 

A #bench at hotel #cipriani in...

A #bench at hotel #cipriani in… (Photo credit: MarcoSecchi)

 

You can certainly spend a great deal of money on a hotel in Venice. A night at the Gritti Palace in high summer will set you back at least £750. But for the same amount you could enjoy an entire week in most of the hotels listed here. You won’t get the same status, or quite the same service, or the same superb location, but you will still find a decently sized room, lots of character and a warm welcome.

 

 

 

Cà del Nobile San Marco 987, ria terà delle Colonne (528 3473; cadelnobile.com)

 

This hotel is just off one of the thronging routes between St Mark’s and the Rialto. Interestingly, it’s in one of the lowest points of the city: if you visit during acqua alta, you’ll be able to watch water bubbling up through the cobblestones below. Lots of stairs and no lift mean that it’s not for the unfit. Price from £79

 

 

 

Domus Orsoni Cannaregio 1045, Sottoportego dei Vedei (275 9538; domusorsoni.it)

 

In 1291, Venice’s glassworkers were banished to the island of Murano. Today, only one glass foundry remains in the city: Orsoni. Located in the Jewish Ghetto, and set in a delightful palazzo overlooking a private garden and the foundry, the Domus Orsoni channels the Orsoni family’s heritage in five rooms, resplendent with glass-mosaic-tiled walls and mosaic art works. Price from £71

 

 

 

Locanda Orseolo (Corte Zorzi; 041 523 5586; www.locandaorseolo.com; £160).

 

Step inside the hotel and you might be in a compartment on the Orient Express: elegant, enveloping, and richly coloured and furnished. But it’s the warmth of the young team at this equally young 15-room hotel that makes it really special – Matteo, Barbara and their brothers, sisters and friends. In the morning, Matteo dons an apron and cooks pancakes and omelettes to order, Barbara serves and everyone chats. The comfortable bedrooms are being transformed to echo the ground floor, complete with hand-painted murals and canopied beds. Secure one and you’ll have a real bargain.

 

 

 

La Villeggiatura San Polo, 1569, Calle dei Botteri (524 4673; lavilleggiatura.it)

 

A short hop from the Rialto markets, in an area buzzing with restaurants and residential activity, La Villeggiatura is an elegantly tasteful home-from-home. Tea and coffee-making equipment in the spacious bedrooms, and gently attentive service, add to the pleasure of a stay here. Price from £71

 

 

 

Hotel Centauro S Marco Calle della Vida Cpo Manin (www.hotelcentauro.com/)

 

Located in the historic centre of Venice just a stone’s throw from St Mark’s Square (five minutes walking distance), the Centauro Hotel offers elegant, welcoming accommodation from which you can enjoy the city’s art and culture. Housed within an ancient palace from the 1500’s, the Centauro Hotel has Venetian style furnishings from the 18th century and 30 comfortable guestrooms. Rooms have air conditioning and satellite television, some have canal views and those on the top floor have a private terrace from which you can enjoy panoramic views over the rooftops of Venice.

 

 

 

Al Ponte Mocenigo This is another charming 16th-century palazzo, so tucked away that you could walk right past and never know it was there. You will find one entrance down a very narrow alley just up from the San Stae vaporetto stop; the other is on the opposite side, over a small bridge. Officially it is a two-star hotel, but frankly it rivals many establishments with double that number of stars. The very smart, high-ceilinged rooms are in Venetian styles and colours. The best are numbers five and six, on the first floor overlooking a tiny canal to one side (they are classed as “superior” doubles and cost £128 in mid-season).

Zingy Gnocchi

  Gnocchi con burro, limone e ricotta

Gnocchi with butter with store-bought gnocchi must be one of the easiest recipes around. Even when you give it a fresh, lemony twist.

Gnocchi with ricotta.

This is a recipe pinched and adapted from the Italian version of La Cucina Italiana. They start by making the gnocchi from scratch, but this time I’ve bought them ready-made, which means you can make the dish in 5 minutes flat, provided of course you have some salted lemon. Otherwise you might have to invest 10 minutes in the preparation of a very fresh and delicious, vegetarian primo piatto.

 

Ingredients

 

1 lemon

2 tbsp salt

75 g butter

100 g ricotta

Fresh basil

salt, pepper

 

Preparation

 

Cook the lemon in boiling and heavily salted water for 15 minutes

Cook the gnocchi in boiling salted water until they pop to the surface

Meanwhile fry the butter until it becomes brown with a slight taste of nuts

Cut the lemon in four wedges, remove the flesh of one wedge, cut the peel in strips and add it to the butter

Mix the cooked gnocchi with lemoned butter, ricotta and leaves of basil before serving

The remaining lemon wedges are really good with white meat or in grain salads.

La Scala del Bovolo

The Palazzo Contarini del Bovolo (also called Palazzo Contarini Minelli dal Bovolo) is a small palace in Venice, Italy, best known for the external spiral staircase, with a plethora of arches, known as the Scala Contarini del Bovolo (of the snail).The palace is located in a less-traveled side-street near the Campo Manin, near the Rialto.

The staircase leads to an arcade, providing a charming panoramic view over some of the roof-tops of the city.

he palace dates from the 15th century. It was designed and built by architect Giovanni Candi in 1499 (Giorgio Spavento is believed to be responsible for the grand spiral staircase on the exterio

via Flickr

Venetian Carnival Masks

The Venetian Carnival is fast approaching and you are looking on a way to make a Mask Creating a Venetian papier mache mask

  • Cut newpapers into strips
  • In a pan, mix a quantity of flour in an equal quantity of water; boil
  • When the mixture is smooth, remove from the stove and let cool
  • Take a blown up balloon and cover with oil
  • Dip the newspaper strips into the mixture and put on the balloon (3 or 4 coats)
  • Put the mask aside for 24 hours
  • When the mask has dried, using a cutter, cut out openings for the eyes, nose and mouth
  • Decorate

or the best way is to get one from our friends at Ca del Sol the best hand made Papier Mache masks in Venice!

The Befana in Venice

Every child of Italian heritage has heard of La Befana, a character in Italian folklore who delivers presents to children throughout Italy. It is believed that the legend of La Befana may have originated in Rome, then spread as a tradition to the rest of Italy. Some believe her name is derived from the word Epiphany, but others say La Befana descended Roman goddess named Strina.

In folklore, Befana visits all the children of Italy on the eve of the 6th of January (the Epiphany) to fill their socks with candy and presents if they are good or a lump of coal or dark candy if they are bad. Because she is a good housekeeper, she will sweep the floor before she leaves. The child's family typically leaves a small glass of wine and a plate with a few morsels of food for La Befana.She is usually portrayed as an old lady riding a broomstick through the air wearing a black shawl and is covered in soot because she enters the children's houses through the chimney. She is often smiling and carries a bag or hamper filled with candy, gifts, or both.

Christian legend has it that La Befana was approached by the magi (the biblical three kings) a few days before Christ's birth. They asked for directions to where the baby Jesus was, but she did not know. She provided them with shelter for a night, as she was considered the best housekeeper in the village with the most pleasant home. They invited her to join them on the journey to find the baby Jesus, but she declined, stating she was too busy with her housework. Later, La Befana had a change of heart, and tried to search out the astrologers and Jesus. That night she was not able to find them, so to this day, La Befana is searching for the baby Jesus. She leaves all the good children toys and candy, while the bad children get coal or bags of ashes.

Venice  Regata della Befana at Arzana..***Agreed Fee's Apply To All Image Use***.Marco Secchi /Xianpix.tel +44 (0)207 1939846.tel +39 02 400 47313. e-mail sales@xianpix.com.www.marcosecchi.com (Marco Secchi)

Another Christian legend takes a slightly darker tone. La Befana was an ordinary woman with a child whom she greatly loved. However, her child died, and her grief maddened her. Upon hearing news of Jesus' birth, she set out to see him, delusional that he was her son. She eventually met Jesus and presented him with gifts to make him happy. The infant Jesus was delighted, and he gave La Befana a gift in return; she would be the mother of every child in Italy.

Italians believe that if one sees La Befana one will receive a thump from her broomstick because she doesn't wish to be seen. This aspect of the tradition may be designed to keep children in their beds while parents are distributing candy (or coal) and sweeping the floor on Epiphany Eve.

Traditionally, all Italian children may expect to find a lump of "coal" in their stockings (actually rock candy made black with caramel coloring), as every child has been at least occasionally bad during the year.

S Martin's Cake

  The Saint Martin Celebration is an old traditional popular celebration in the North East of Italy that is rooted into the territory and has very old traditions

S. Martin xe 'ndà in sofita a trovar ea nonna Rita nona Rita no ghe gera S.Martin col cùeo par tera E col nostro sachetìn cari signori xe S.Martin

San Martin's short pastry cake

This short pastry cake is made in Venice to celebrate the feast day of Saint Martin, on 11th November every year, and it is a favourite with Venetian children who receive one from their grandparents and parents. The cake is in the shape of Saint Martin on horseback with his sword and, if you come to Venice in that period, you will see it in confectioners’ windows, decorated with sugar icing or coated with plain or milk chocolate and decorated with chocolate drops and candies

 

Oven-proof paper mould Download it here Prepare the paper mould used to cut out the cake. Cut a sheet of oven-proof paper measuring about 30x40 cm. Draw the shape of Saint Martin on horseback with his sword on the paper, cut it out and set it aside.

Alternatively, in Venice, during the period of the feast day, you can buy the cake mould in shops specialised in household goods.

Ingredients for a “Saint Martin” of 20x30 cm

For the short pastry: 250 gr flour 150 gr butter 100 gr sugar 1 egg yolk + 1 whole egg ½ sachet vanillin or vanilla flavouring

For the icing and decoration: 250 – 300 gr icing sugar 1 egg white 5 drops lemon juice 100 gr mixed sweets: chocolate Smarties, sugar sweets, candies, chocolate drops Cooking time: 15/20 minutes at 180°C

Preparation Light the oven. Prepare the pastry base by putting into a bowl, in this order, the flour, the sugar, the softened butter cut into small pieces, the yolk and the whole egg. Keep the extra egg white to one side in a bowl. Start mixing the ingredients by hand, crushing together the eggs, butter and sugar. Once they are fairly well mixed, add the flour and vanilla flavouring. Knead the mixture with your fingertips until it is homogeneous as regards both consistency and colour, working into a ball. Sprinkle some flour on a sheet of oven-proof paper and roll out the pastry into a rectangular sheep measuring about 30x40 cm and cut the outline of the cake. If you like, you can use the trimmings to make a round biscuit. Put the cake in the oven and bake till golden (it will take about 15/20 minutes). When the short pastry is ready, leave it to cool and start to prepare the icing. Put the egg white in a bowl and add the icing sugar, a teaspoonful at a time, stirring with a wooden spoon. When the first teaspoonful has been absorbed, add the second and so on, until you have added half the sugar. At this point squeeze 5 drops of lemon juice into the icing and keep stirring and adding the icing sugar as before. At the end the mixture will be quite thick and you will have to stir it energetically for a minute until it is nice and shiny. Pour the icing into a bag with a medium star-shaped nozzle and start decorating the biscuit. Scatter the biscuit as desired with chocolate drops, sweets or candies. When you have finished decorating it, let the icing “dry” for about 12 hours at room temperature.

An extra idea If you want, you can cover Saint Martin with melted chocolate or colour the icing with food colourings, choose the sweets for decorating it with your children, or change the shape of the cake, for example making biscuits with a hole at the top that you can decorate and hang on the Christmas tree.